Cyber risk is seen as a present and obvious risk, board members have to be aware of the risks facing their company to guide the organisation to its most secure course. But it’s not always easy.

Historically, cybersecurity has been an area that was reserved for technologists working in distant server rooms. Cybersecurity has now become a business risk that impacts every aspect of a business particularly in the wake of recent mega breaches such as those at Colonial Pipeline and Equifax.

As a result boards are demanding more from their security and CISOs. Whether it’s increasing spending on new solutions or ensuring employees are properly trained, board members need a clear and compelling vision of how a properly-trained security team can protect itself from the most sophisticated threats. And this message must be conveyed in a manner that is easily understood by nontechnical executives in the boardroom.

One method to accomplish this is through leveraging real-time metrics and aligning security with business goals. You can provide the board with the information they require to make the right decisions by providing regular communications that present the evolution of security measures, a declining index of risk and other crucial metrics. Another approach is to narrate impact, rather than pass along numbers – tell https://greatboardroom.com/boardroom-information-security-questions-your-board-will-ask/ an engaging story. Through sharing a real-life story of how the quick actions of your team averted an enormous threat, you can demonstrate to your board that they are being protected and that their efforts are having an impact.